12th Annual Conference & Meeting           March 16 - 17, 2020 - Washington, DC

Mark your calendar!  Planning is already underway for the 12th Annual SBCA Conference and Meeting. The Conference dates are March 16-17, 2020 on the campus of The George Washington University.  SBCA greatly appreciates the work of Susan Dudley, Director, The George Washington University Regulatory Studies Center and Distinguished Professor of Practice, Trachtenberg School of Public Policy & Public Administration for sponsoring the Society’s use of the space.

Call for Submissions - 2020 Conference and Workshops

The Society for Benefit-Cost Analysis (SBCA) is now accepting abstracts and workshop proposals for participation in our 2020 annual conference to be held March 16-17, 2020. Abstracts and proposals are due by September 6, 2019.  Acceptance notifications will be made by November 15, 2019. 

Interested in helping your colleagues develop new skills or learn about new topics? We welcome workshop proposals on any topic related to benefit-cost analysis that will be of interest to others working in this field. Workshops may address basic skills or emerging issues. Topics of interest to those working in academia, government, industry, or nonprofits, in the U.S. or elsewhere, are welcome. 

For more information on submitting an abstract or workshop proposal, click here!

2019 Conference Agenda & Abstracts

If you would like to view the Abstracts, Agenda, & Video that are from the 2019 Annual Conference & Meeting, they can be found here, and on the Conference page under the 2019 Conference Agenda & Abstract page!

The Society would like to thank everyone involved in helping make the 2019 SBCA Annual Conference a success! The SBCA has uploaded photos from this years Conference onto the SBCA Facebook page.

Blog - Call for Submissions

“On Balance”– the Blog of the Society for Benefit Cost Analysis – provides a venue for members and other practitioners to share their research, experiences, and perspectives on various issues relevant to benefit-cost analysis. We encourage all interested in benefit cost analysis to submit pitches or completed draft blog posts.

Before submitting your pitch or draft blog post, please review Submission Guidelines for Authors, which also includes a description of sample feature types and lengths, and a style guide for posts.

Pitches and draft blog posts may be emailed to Fran Sussman, the editor of On Balance, at info@benefitcostanalysis.org. Please include your name, email address, and a two to three sentence bio. 

Read the Latest Blog

On Balance: Assessing Ohio’s Use of Benefit-Cost Analysis by Rob Moore

Since Ronald Reagan’s 1981 Executive Order 12291 established benefit-cost analysis as standard practice for major rule changes, benefit-cost analysis has been commonly used to assess the efficiency of proposed federal regulations. Because of this and subsequent executive orders, all federal regulations that are projected to have a total economic impact of over $100 million are subject to a full benefit-cost analysis. Despite this prevalence at the federal level, benefit-cost analysis is much less common at the state level. In 2013, the Pew-MacArthur Results First Initiative released a study of the use of benefit-cost analysis in the states (study results were subsequently reported in the Journal of Benefit Cost Analysis in 2015). The study found that, over the four years from 2008 to 2011 states conducted only 36 full cost benefit analyses and 312 partial cost-benefit analyses. This averaged out to 9 full analyses and 78 partial analyses per year across all 50 states.

To continue reading, check out the On Balance Blog here.

On Balance

The opinions expressed in "On Balance" posts are those of the individual authors and do not represent the views of the Society for Benefit-Cost Analysis or other organization. The Society is open to proposals for posts on opposing views.