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SBCA Online Workshops

Faculty include world-class authorities from the field of benefit-cost analysis. To enhance the online learning experience, each workshop will be spread over multiple days and provide opportunities for direct engagement with faculty.
 

Upcoming Online Workshops
 

A Voice Crying in the Wilderness? Techniques for Promoting the
Use of Evidence and BCA Results to Policymakers

April 13 & 14, 11:00 am -1:00 pm US eastern time
See additional information below
Registration is Open
 

Benefit-Cost Analysis in Low- and Middle-Income Countries
May 3, 5, & 7, 11:00 am -1:30 pm US eastern time
(Optional office hours on May 4 & 6)
See additional information below
Registration is Open


Cost-Benefit Analysis of Environmental Health Interventions
July 12, 9:00 am -12:00 pm US ET & July 13, 6:00 pm - 8:00 pm US eastern time
See additional information below
Registration coming soon


Benefit-Cost Analysis for Beginners
September 16 & 17, 11:00 am -1:00 pm US eastern time
See additional information below
Registration coming soon


 


Workshop Descriptions

A Voice Crying in the Wilderness? Techniques for Promoting the Use of Evidence and BCA Results to Policymakers

There are increasing calls for government officials to use benefit-cost analysis (BCA) and related forms of evidence to inform budget and policy decisions. Yet, as the intended consumers of BCA, policymakers are typically unfamiliar with the concepts, assumptions, and methods used to carry out these studies, which can cause confusion or dismissal of findings. It is critical for analysts to know how to present BCA findings and related evidence in a clear and convincing manner. It is also vital for analysts to build effective long-term relationships to gain the trust of policymakers, and to help them devise policy levers that promote the ongoing use of BCA results and related evidence into the policy process.
 
This workshop will train participants on ways to effectively bring BCA results and related evidence to government officials in the fast-paced policy process and to help build a culture of evidence use within the executive and legislative branches. The presenters bring decades of experience working with public leaders and their key staff as well as best practices gained from working with federal and state government in the United States, and other national governments, to promote evidence-based policymaking.
 
The topics include effective modes of communicating complex findings to policymakers through presentations, reports, in-person briefings, and social media. It also includes effective approaches for building partnerships with policymakers and their key staff to gain the confidence and support of these key stakeholders and discussion of proven mechanisms for promoting the use of BCA and rigorous evidence in the policy and budget processes. This 2-day workshop includes a mixture of lecture-style presentations, discussion, and hands-on problem-solving. Participants will be asked to bring a sample of their work as well as practical questions to collaborate on with the facilitators.

About the presenters:Dates and Times:
April 13 & 14, 11:00 am -1:00 pm US eastern time

Fee: $300 per person

Registration is Open

 


Benefit-Cost Analysis in Low- and Middle-Income Countries

This online workshop addresses the use of benefit-cost analysis to evaluate policies for improving health and longevity in low- and middle-income countries, focusing on practical application. Participants will develop an understanding of the fundamental concepts that underlie benefit-cost analysis, consider its advantages and limitations, explore its major components and what each should include, and gain familiarity with default estimates for valuing changes in health and longevity.
 
The workshop is based on “Reference Case Guidelines for Benefit-Cost Analysis in Global Health and Development,” funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. These guidelines are intended to increase the comparability of these analyses, improve their quality, and expand their use. The workshop combines presentation with substantial opportunities for interaction and discussion, including case studies. It is designed for those with relatively little experience conducting or reviewing these analyses, although some familiarity with approaches for economic evaluation is desirable. The workshop is intended for cost-effectiveness analysts as well as benefit-cost analysis practitioners, and scholars, policymakers, and other stakeholders who want to increase their understanding of benefit-cost analysis and its application to public health issues globally.

About the presenters:
  • Lisa A. Robinson is a Senior Research Scientist, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, and Deputy Director, Center for Health Decision Science. She is also affiliated with the Center for Risk Analysis. Her research focuses on the conduct of benefit-cost analysis, particularly for policies with outcomes that cannot be fully valued using market measures. She is a past President of the Society for Benefit-Cost Analysis and a member of the Journal of Benefit-Cost Analysis Editorial Board.
  • Maureen Cropper is a Distinguished University Professor of Economics at the University of Maryland, a Senior Fellow at Resources for the Future, and a former Lead Economist at the World Bank. She is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and a Fellow of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists.
  • James K. Hammitt is Professor of Economics and Decision Sciences at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, where he is affiliated with the Center for Health Decision Science and directs the Harvard Center for Risk Analysis. He is also affiliated with the Toulouse School of Economics. His research concerns the development and application of quantitative methods for evaluating health and environmental policies.
  • Dean Jamison is the Edward A. Clarkson Professor Emeritus of Global Health at the University of California, San Francisco. He has long been a practitioner of cost-effectiveness analysis and benefit-cost analysis in global health and development, leading numerous major efforts to evaluate investments and inform priorities such as the Lancet Commission on Investing in Health and the Disease Control Priorities Project.
  • Mark Radin is a PhD student in the Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. His research focuses on the economic costs and benefits of environmental health, primarily in low- and middle-income countries. He has worked with the Copenhagen Consensus Center to support benefit-cost analyses of water and sanitation and family planning policies in Ghana, Haiti, and Malawi.
  • Damian Walker is a non-resident fellow at the Center for Global Development.  Previously he was the Deputy Director of Data and Analytics in the Global Development Division at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, where he led the development of reference case guidance for cost-effectiveness analysis and benefit-cost analysis. He focuses on the economic evaluation of health programs in low- and middle-income countries.
  • Tommy Wilkinson is a senior economist in the Health Nutrition and Population Global Practice at the World Bank. He was a lead author of the reference case guidance for cost-effectiveness analysis that provided the starting point for the guidelines for benefit-cost analysis. He focuses on health system redesign analytics and economic evaluation methodology research.
  • Brad Wong is the Chief Economist of the Copenhagen Consensus Center. He works with economists, sector experts, and policymakers to conduct benefit-cost analyses to support cross-sectoral priority-setting in low- and middle-income countries. He is also a section editor for an Oxford University Press Encyclopaedia chapter focusing on the costs and benefits of water, sanitation, and hygiene interventions.

Dates and Times:
May 3, 5, & 7, 11:00 am -1:30 pm US eastern time, with optional office hours on May 4 & 6

Fee: $450 per person

Registration is Open
 


 

Cost-Benefit Analysis of Environmental Health Interventions
 

Cost-Benefit Analysis is increasingly being used to assess the impacts of environment on human health. The workshop will provide a step-by-step practical guide to the Cost-Benefit Analysis of Environmental Health Interventions.  During the workshop, we will discuss and illustrate how to conduct a Cost-Benefit Analysis (CBA) using existing guidelines from different countries (EPA, UK guidelines for CBA, and WHO guide for cost-effectiveness analysis of environmental health interventions).  The workshop will start with the description of the economics behind CBA and will combine practical case studies with substantial opportunities for discussion. Participants will develop a basic understanding of Cost-Benefit Analysis and its application to a wide range of environmental health interventions (e.g. remediation of polluted sites, interventions targeting air pollution, etc).

About the presenters:

  • Carla Guerriero is Assistant Professor in Economics University of Naples Federico II. Since 2009, her research and teaching  focuses on the methodology and the application of Cost-Benefit Analysis to  Environmental Health Interventions and on the development of novel techniques to value children’s health.  Carla has published her research in national and international research journals including Ecological Economics, Journal for Environmental Managment, Plos One, The European Journal of Health Economics and Environmental Health. Carla conducted the first cost benefit analysis of remediating polluted sites and she authored the book: Cost-Benefit Analysis of Environemntal Health Interventions published by Academic Press in 2020.

  • Marco Martuzzi is the Head of the Asia-Pacific Centre for Environment and Health of the World Health Organization Regional Office for the Western Pacific. He is an epidemiologist with experience in environmental and occupational studies. He previously worked at the Italian Institute of Health, the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, the Imperial College School of Medicine (UK), the WHO International Agency for Research on Cancer (France), and at the WHO European Centre for Environment and Health, in Bonn, Germany. He obtained a PhD in community medicine from the University of London, in 1996. His current work is concerned with the impacts of environmental risk factors and determinants on health and health equity, with a view to addressing the pressing challenges of the Anthropocene, such as climate and ecosystems breakdown.

  • Stefano Papirio is a tenure-track Assistant Professor in Sanitary and Environmental Engineering at University of Naples Federico II. Born in 1986, Stefano Papirio got his M.Sc. degree with honors in Environmental Engineering in 2009 at University of Naples Federico II, and obtained his Ph.D. degree in Civil Engineering in 2013 at University of Cassino and Southern Lazio. Former research assistant at UNESCO-IHE Institute for Water Education (Delft, The Netherlands) in 2009, Dr. Papirio worked almost three years at Tampere University of Technology (Tampere, Finland) as visiting PhD student and then as Post-Doc researcher from 2011 to 2014. In 2013, he won the Italian Award for the best doctoral thesis in the Sanitary and Environmental Engineering disciplines. In August-September 2018, he was invited as visiting researcher at National University of Ireland (Galway, Ireland). He has been co-coordinator of two European Joint Doctorate projects in the Erasmus Mundus and Marie Curie H2020 ITN frameworks. He is coordinator at UNINA of the CEOMED project funded within the ENI CBC MED programme. He is co-author of 60 peer-review publications indexed in Scopus, with 1,100 citations and H-index of 21.

  • John Wright is Associate Professor at the Institute for Public Policy at the University of Technology in Sydney. He completed his PhD in the Department of Government at the Centre for Public Policy at the University of Melbourne.  John has held post-doctoral appointments at the University of Birmingham in the Department of Public Health and Epidemiology working on area-based regeneration schemes, with a focus on participation, decentralization, and methods and processes for health and environmental impact assessments. He also completed post-doctoral work at the Regulatory Institutions Network in the Research School Social Sciences, Australian National University, on regulation and governance theory. John was a lecturer at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine in the Department of Public Health and Policy working on the regulation and new governance arrangements of acute English hospitals. From 2010-2017, John was a Senior Research Fellow, then an Associate Professorial Research Fellow, in the Department of Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science in pharmaceutical regulation, European methods and processes for technology assessment, European investment, and research in non-Communicable Diseases, and European Public Spending reform.


Dates and Times:
July 12, 9:00 am -12:00 pm US ET & July 13, 6:00 pm - 8:00 pm US ET

Fee: $375 per person
 


 

Benefit-Cost Analysis for Beginners

This short course will provide an introduction for 'beginners' who have not previously had formal instruction in BCA. It is designed to help those who encounter BCA to better understand its purpose and methods as well as those who are curious about how it might be useful in their work. Although some prior exposure to economics would be helpful, the workshop is designed to be accessible to a general audience. Upon completion of the workshop, attendees should have a clear understanding of the purpose, underlying concepts, strengths, and weaknesses of BCA.
 
The workshop will compare BCA to other analytical approaches commonly employed by policy analysts to put it into perspective. It will also introduce and explain a number of key BCA concepts including standing (whose costs and benefits count), incremental costs and benefits (clear alternatives to current policy), opportunity cost (what we give up to do the alternative), willingness to pay (how much people value the impacts of the alternative), 'shadow prices' (monetizing impacts), discounting (taking account of the timing of costs and benefits), and sensitivity analysis (taking account of uncertainty). Several examples of BCAs will be distributed prior to the workshop to provide illustrations of concepts and facilitate discussion among attendees.

About the presenters:

  • Glenn C. Blomquist is Carl F. Pollard Professor of Health Economics and Professor of Economics and Public Policy Emeritus at the University of Kentucky.  His work deals with valuation of risks to human health, urban and environmental amenities, and BCA. He has been a Fulbright Scholar in Latvia and visiting professor at Stockholm School of Economics and University of Chicago. He is the former editor of the Journal of Benefit-Cost Analysis. He is a graduate of Ohio Wesleyan University, B.A., Ohio State University, M.A., and the University of Chicago, Ph.D. 

  • David L. Weimer is Edwin E. Witte Professor of Political Economy at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. His recent research addresses topics in health policy and governance. He is the author of Behavioral Economics for Cost-Benefit Analysis (Cambridge University Press, 2017) and co-author of Cost-Benefit Analysis 5th ed. (Cambridge University Press, 2018). He served as president of the Society for Benefit-Cost Analysis (2013) and the Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management (2006) and is a Fellow of the National Academy of Public Administration.  He is a graduate of the University of Rochester and earned his Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley.

Dates and Times:
September 16 & 17, 11:00 am -1:00 pm US eastern time

Fee: $300 per person


Please Note
Registration will be capped.
 Please register soon to ensure your spot. Check back periodically for additional information and offerings.

Supporting SBCA
It is generous donations from people like you who make these offerings possible.  Please consider joining our efforts to strengthen the benefit-cost analysis profession through membership and/or by making a donation.